Plain Weave Carbon VS. Twill Weave Carbon: Which is better??




Plain Weave Carbon (3K 5.7oz)





Twill Weave Carbon (3K 2×2 5.7oz)



Carbon fiber fabrics typically come in 1k, 3k, 6k, and 12k tow sizes. The tow size refers to filament thickness. For example, a 12k tow size will have a carbon weave thickness twice the size of a 6k tow size. Most carbon parts in the automotive after-market will be in 3K sizes.


Here are the two most common carbon textile specifications in the automotive after-market:


3K 2×2 5.7oz Twill Weave Carbon
3K 5.7oz Plain Weave Carbon (Commonly referred to as “1×1 weave”. “1×1 weave” is an industry misnomer)


So which is better? Which one should you select?


Structurally, there is a marginal difference between the two, so choose which looks best to you. It really boils down to personal preference. Our best advice is to try your best to stick to one carbon weave as plain and twill weave are noticeably different. Plain weave has a smaller and tighter looking pattern and generally more subtle in appearance. You really have to get up close to notice its weave. Twill weave has a more dramatic diagonal-like pattern and more noticeable from further away. If you prefer subtle, Plain Weave is the way to go.


However, Twill Weave carbon is more abundant in the market place. Twill Weave carbon is what most envision when they think of carbon fiber. Roughly 80% of our customers choose Twill Weave over Plain Weave. Whether that decision is based on what they feel looks better or just simply trying to match carbon fiber they already have… we’re not sure. Matching the carbon weave around the car is probably more important than deciding which weave looks better. Most carbon parts manufacturers simplify their selection by offering parts in Twill Weave carbon only … especially companies producing replica parts. This just goes to show Twill Weave carbon is the safer bet in the market. We’re one of the few companies who offer both weaves as we feel it is important to match carbon weaves. This is important because there are a myriad of brand name parts coming from Japan that are only offered in Plain Weave.


Which looks better? Which looks more high-end or expensive?


We are often asked these question when a customer is asking for our opinion. Ferrari strictly uses Plain Weave and they offer some of the most beautiful interior and exterior parts in the industry. Most other manufacturers such as Lamborghini and Mclaren stick with Twill weave as it is currently the safer bet. But it could also be the safer bet because most find Twill weave to be more appealing. Although most of our orders are coming in for Twill Weave, we actually prefer Plain Weave :) . If you’re execution is on point, you can’t go wrong either way.




We’ve provided a convenient list of some of the more well-known manufacturers/brands who offer offer Plain or Twill Weave carbon parts. Some have a history of offering both, so be sure to take a look at both lists when planning your carbon purchases.




Here is a list of manufacturers/brands known to use Twill Weave Carbon:


Lamborghini (Italy)
Alfa Romeo (Italy)
Mclaren (UK)
BMW (Germany)
Porsche (Germany)
Recaro (Germany)
Seibon (China Taiwan)
VIS (USA/China/Taiwan)
Evo-R (China/Taiwan)
Extreme Dimensions (China/Taiwan)
AIT (China/Taiwan)
APR (China/Taiwan)
ASM (Japan)
Amuse (Japan)
Aimgain (Japan)
Voltex (Japan)
Varis (Japan)
Mine’s (Japan)
BRIDE (Japan)
Bodyshop Kobayashi (Japan)
Outerplus (Japan)
Benetec (Japan)
Nismo (Japan) R35 GTR items.
Ridox (Both Plain & Twill) (Japan)
Taitec (Japan)
Downforce (USA)
Vorsteiner (USA)
Password JDM (USA)
Forbidden (USA)
Reverie (UK)







Here is a list of manufacturers/brands known to use Plain Weave Carbon:


Ferrari (Italy)
Porsche (Germany)
BMW (Germany)
Recaro ASM (Japan)
Spoon (Japan)
J’s racing (J’s racing GT wings made by Voltex in Twill) (Japan)
Toda (Japan)
Mazdaspeed (Japan)
FEED (Japan)
RE-Amemiya (Japan)
Autoexe (Japan)
Odula (Japan)
Top Secret (Japan)
SARD (Japan)
Tom’s (Japan)
Wald (Japan)
Mode Parfume (Japan)
Mugen (Japan)
Nismo (Japan)
TRD (Japan)
RE-Amemiya (Japan)
RSD (Japan)
Gruppe M (Japan)
Chargespeed (Japan)
Do-Luck (Japan)
Ridox (Japan)
C-West (Japan)
Downforce (USA)
Vorsteiner (USA)
Forbidden (USA)