Our Recommended Painting Process

Want to paint your new Shine Auto part? Check out this guide for our recommended painting process. Mirrored below:

 

Painting Shine Auto Project Hybrid FRP Aero Parts

Recommendations by Makito Nakai

*Shine Auto Project’s Hybrid FRP Aero Parts are basically flexible fiberglass parts. FRP stands for Fiber Reinforced Plastic, and that is simply what fiberglass is. Fiberglass is considered a plastic in the composites industry. However, our parts differ from conventional FRP aero parts because we use an undisclosed combination of special surface coats, resin, and fabric to give our parts the flexible properties it needs. Conventional FRP aero parts are made with a gel coat surface, which is brittle and harder to sand. Our Hybrid FRP parts have a flexible black primer surface, exclusively formulate for us, which is easier to sand and adheres much better to other primers as well as paint. Gel coats do not adhere to paint very well, which is why paint tends to peel off if the part it is not prepped meticulously. Primer is used as the link to adhere the two.

The “VIP Special”

Materials:

1. Primer :RM Diamont DP-200
2. Flex agent: DF-25
3. Hardener: Diamont PH-10 Hardender

Ratio: 4/1/1

4 Primer (DP-200)/ 1 Hardener (PH-10 Hardener)/ 1 Flex Agent (DF-25)
4. Base Coat: Diamont RM or Glasurit (no mix)
5. Clear Coat: Daimont DC-5800 + flex agent (DF-25)
6. Hardener: DH-99 (Not the same as the primer hardener)
7. Reducer: VR-29

Ratio: 4/1/1/1

4 Clear Coat (DC-5800)/ 1 Flex Agent (DF-25) / 1 Hardener (DH-99)/ 1 Reducer: VR-29

1. Wash the bumper with Dawn original soap. This helps rid of oils and mold release on the surface of the part.

2. Sand the bumper down with 320 grit sand paper. Wet sanding is preferred because it cuts faster. You might want to use a flexible steel sheet or a block as backing to get the ultimate smooth surface.

3. After that is done. Clean the part again and let it dry.

4. Primer the part. Just make sure the whole surface is covered. If you are painting your car a dark color, it might not matter because our surface coat is a flexible black primer. However, if you’re painting the part a light color such as white, it would be best to neutralize the part with as much gray primer as possible. Spraying on a sealer should also help.

5. Let the primer dry accordingly. Maybe 2-3 hours. Wet sand the part again with 320 or 400 using the same procedure. Then use 600, 800, 1000 for the ultimate surface. 600 is usually adequate. Sanding it 800 or 1000 gives a better finish, but more work = more $$$. You get what you pay for.

6. Clean the part. Let it dry. Spray base coat.

7. Let the base coat dry. Apply Clear coat. How many passes is up to the jugdment of the sprayer/painter. Unless he’s Mr. Perfect, the clear coat will not spray on perfectly flat. The clear coat will usually be wavy. This is where “color sanding” comes in to even out the surface. Most OEM paint jobs have an orange peel texture to it as well. It is up to you if you want to match that orange peel texture or if you want a smooth mirror like finish.

8. Wait a day or two for drying time.

9. “Color Sand/Wet Sand” Sand 1000, 1200, 1500 . …. Be very careful with this procedure.

10. Buff.